The fabulous printed magazine for children

Scoop is a monthly printed magazine aimed at children aged 8 and above 

Scoop is about indulging children’s love of the unexpected. Our aim is to enthuse children about the written word in as many ways as possible. It’s not only about books; it’s about all forms of story, hence our Dig into the Story motto.

Each issue includes short stories, poetry and graphic fiction that will excite and entertain. We publish include biography and non-fiction, exploring everything from history and science to art and the unexplained. We are also featuring comic strips, activities, puzzles and jokes, and we are always looking for an international perspective. Scoop is created for children, and it will also be in part by children as we run at  competitions every month centred around themes and ideas covered in the magazine.

Scoop will be the best present for any child who deserves a treat. It’s for children who are passionate (or about to be passionate!) about reading, who want to know what’s going on in the world, who have a terrific sense of humour, and who love the idea of writing for a magazine and winning creative competitions. Not least, Scoop is for children who will be thrilled to receive their very own magazine in the post, addressed only to them.

Scoop is a magazine about taking part. Young people can get involved right now by visiting the competitions page. We’re also publishing book reviews by children, and are planning to host a series of scoop-tacular creative workshops at festivals. So there you have it. That’s Scoop.

Some of Scoop’s contributors

Jacqueline Wilson always wanted to be an author and wrote her first ‘novel’ when she was nine. One of Jacqueline’s most successful creations has been Tracy Beaker. In 2002 Jacqueline was awarded the OBE for services to literacy in schools, and in 2008 she became Dame Jacqueline Wilson.

Herbie Brennan lives and works in Ireland. He has written more than 110 books, including Faerie Wars Chronicles and the Forbidden Truths series. He’s fascinated by such weird and wonderful topics as out-of-body experiences, Atlantis, hypnosis and parallel worlds.

Joanna Lumley is an actress, author and activist. She starred as Patsy Stone in Absolutely Fabulous. She has been an advocate for charities including the Gurkha Justice Campaign, Survival International and Tree Aid. She loves poetry.

Piers Torday wrote the Last Wild Trilogy (Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize) and There May Be a Castle. He recently completed his father’s unfinished novel, Death of an Owl. You can read his stories in Winter Magic, Wisp of Wisdom and Scoop!

Laura Dockrill is a poet, author and illustrator. She has written and illustrated her own books of poems and the Darcy Burdock series for children, and Lorali for young adults. She grew up in South London, writing from an early age, and attended The BRIT School of Performing Arts. Her first job was at the make-up counter in Topshop. When she’s not writing, Laura will be walking her pet pug dog, Pig.

Abi Elphinstone grew up in Scotland, where she spent her weekends hiding in tree houses and running wild across highland glens. Abi is the author of The Dreamsnatcher and The Shadow Keeper and a third book, The Night Spinner, will complete the Tribe’s adventures in 2017. Abi also volunteers as a reading helper for a charity called Beanstalk and travels the world hunting for her next stories.

Neil Gaiman writes books. Some of them are for adults, like American Gods, and some of them are comics, like the Sandman series, and some of them have pictures, like Crazy Hair and Blueberry Girl. He was awarded the Newbery Medal and the Carnegie Medal for The Graveyard Book. He lives in the United States.

Chris Priestley is an award-winning children’s book author. Ever since he was a teenager he has loved unsettling and creepy stories. He hopes his books will haunt his readers in the way his favourite authors have haunted him.

Catherine Johnson is a Londoner who lives by the sea in East Sussex. She loves writing about the people you don’t often see in regular history. Although the characters in her historical novels are made up, they’re always based on truths. She’s the author of Sawbones and Blade and Bone, about the apprentice surgeon Ezra McAdam, who realises that the dead won’t stay buried. Catherine has also written The Curious Tale of the Lady Caraboo and Arctic Hero, as well as for TV, radio and film. 

Gareth P. Jones lives in London with his wife, Lisa, and their two children, Herbie and Autumn. The Thornthwaite Inheritance won numerous local book awards while The Considine Curse was voted Blue Peter Book of the Year. This October sees the publication of his twenty-ninth book, The Thornthwaite Betrayal (Piccadilly Press), in which he returns to Thornthwaite Manor and the pair of twins who have spent their lives trying to kill each other. 

Emerald Fennell is a writer and actress living in London. She has written three books: Shiverton Hall, The Creeper and the dark comedy Monsters. She writes for the E4 comedy Drifters and recently starred in Call the Midwife, The Danish Girl and Pan.

Sir Tom Stoppard has written for the stage, film, TV and radio. His plays include ArcadiaThe Real Thing and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. He co-wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for Shakespeare in Love. Sir Tom is widely regarded as Britain’s greatest living playwright and he was knighted for his services to drama in 1997. 

Yann Le Bec grew up in Brittany and moved to London to study illustration at the Royal College of Art. He published Danny, his first children book, in collaboration with his brother Gwendal, and they're about to publish a new book Raymond with Walker Books. He now lives in Paris.

Lucy Coats is an English writer of poetry and novels. Her books include the Beasts of Olympus series and the novels Hootcat Hill and Cleo. Lucy has a desk-dog called Hero who is very good at encouraging Lucy when writing is going slowly.

Tom Whipple is Science Editor at The Times. He studied maths at Cambridge, but soon realised he preferred journalism to calculus. Tom has reported from the world’s hottest sauna and from Europe’s highest mountain. He is so competitive that his wife refuses to play Scrabble with him.

Andrew Donkin lives and works in London which he likes but cannot really afford. He has written over sixty books and graphic novels divided equally between fiction and non-fiction. He loves rockets, dinosaurs, polar exploration, and the Loch Ness Monster. He especially loves making comics with artist, Giovanni Rigano.

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